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1965 C10 Chevy Custom Pickup

This body…

1965 Chevy C10 Pickup

on this frame…

new frame for a 1965 Chevy C10 pickup

EMC’s newest project – a 1965 C10 Chevy Custom Pickup Truck

1965 Chevy C10 in metal shop

After being test fitted to the new Dropped and Bagged frame, the cab and bed were measured to make sure the GM LS3 engine and auto trans would not interfere with the old sheet metal. Jason then hand formed the new lower firewall and tunnel and welded it onto place.

1965 Chevy C10 new fabricated firewall1965 Chevy C10 new fabricated firewall

Custom hood hinges were  mounted to the cowl and hood for a clean look. Rust repair can be seen on the firewall.

1965 Chevy C10 start on new fender fabrication 1965 Chevy C10 start on new fender fabrication

Custom metal fender  wheel wells will be fitted next. Stay tuned!

Progress Update January 2020

Off again, on again, the truck cab is mated to the frame and is now a permanent fitment. Inner fender well in the front coming together, radiator fitted and the fuel tank and Air Bag Compressor/tank unit installed – ready for the hard part…..

1965 Chevy C10

January Update

1965 Chevy C10

 

 

Wiring the LS engine…. Jason made a “One off” junction box for a nice looking water proof install.

1965 Chevy C10 wiring junction box 1965 Chevy C10 wiring junction box

Battery 101

There are a couple times a year when humidity, heat, or cold, and other elements, result in battery problems.
WHAT KIND OF PROBLEMS?battery terminal corrosion
The problems that are most common result in battery draw or insulation from recharging. When starting,  there is a big current draw to turn the engine over. When charging at low current flow,  it takes very little resistance to reduce or prevent charging the battery from the generator. What kind of resistance? Any kind of corrosion as shown in the photo. Or a “blackening” of the positive or negative terminal. All terminals and cable connectors need to be cleaned to a Bright Color to make a good low resistance connection. If you have any White or Green Stuff on your your battery terminals, you also probably have conductivity across the top of the battery positive to negative terminals. This is a very low current draw on your battery. Over time your battery can go dead. Clean the terminals and the battery top with Baking Soda and Water.

1984 Mercedes SL 380 – for Sale

1984 SL 380 – Call Bruce at 410 822 8322 for sale info

1984 Mercedes SL 380

1984 Mercedes SL 380

1984 Mercedes SL 380 interior

Hot Rod Wiring Do’s and Don’ts

dash wiring in progressAre you building your dream car or are you contemplating buying a custom one-of-a-kind car that was built by someone else? I have bought a few custom built cars over the years. Many of these car builds were done by “professional” builders. Others were done by guys just building their dream machine. For me,  many of them had one big mistake in common. You would think, with all the very nice after-market wiring kits out there, rewiring an old car or building a new one would be easy and without any mistakes. Well, from my perspective,  a very common simple, overlooked problem plagues many “one off” builds. Even cars built by “big time” builders.

Has this every happened to you? You are driving down the road in your custom ride. It’s got a super paint job. It has an awesome interior, a thunderous engine, and a head turning sound. You’re crusin. You’re getting looks and “thumbs up”.  Your car suddenly quits… Dead… You are sitting there thinking “what the heck happened?” After a little help and advice from bystanders watching you ponder your problem under the hood of your ride, you think “the electric fuel pump isn’t working.” Somewhere you come up with a test light and discover you have no “power” at the pump. Well, all you have to do now is look at the “fuel pump” fuse. “Holy Crap!  Where is the fuse block!?”

Well you can bet the fuse block is in the car somewhere, but where? I’ve been there.  Most builders put fuse blocks in a very logical place, then build the car around it, hiding the fuses from plain sight. If you didn’t build the car,  you probably didn’t get any instructions on how to access the fuses. Finding the fuse block can be a nightmare. Once located,  seeing, checking or removing a fuse can only be accomplished by a contortionist!

If you are building a car, spend a lot of time contemplating the location for your fuse block. If you buy a custom built car,  ask and document the location of fuses, relays, and wire looms. Troubleshooting an electrical problem with poorly placed fuses and wiring can be a nightmare! If a wiring diagram didn’t come with your custom build,  see if you can “pick the brain” of the builder.  Take notes.  If you can’t trace the build history… well…. good luck!

Sooner or later you will have to check a fuse. If “Murphy” has anything to do with the timing for a fuse check, it will be at a time and place that will have you exclaiming, “who put it there!!?”

1957 Chevrolet Nomad

teal 1957 Chevy Nomad

1957 Nomad  Very original car in good overall condition. It has had some upgrades like the mag wheels and a new 4 barrel carb, but most of the original stuff is still on the car. 265 V8 engine and 3 speed trans. Runs, drives and stops OK. Drive it as it is or an excellent candidate for a complete redo. Typical weak spots include the floor pan, inner rockers and body braces. Nomads are hard to find and are like money in the bank. For Sale info call Bruce at 410-822-8322 Read More→